K9 Division

Reinstating the Division
The Zionsville Police Department is looking to better the community and better its department by bringing back the K9 division.

Zionsville Police Chief Rob Knox said the prior program was discontinued several years ago when the department retired the canine and promoted the handler to other administrative responsibilities.

“There is definitely a need,” Knox said. “Most agencies have a unit and some have multiple dogs.” Knox said within the past year, they have had to make several calls to other agencies with a K-9 unit. One of the major disadvantages of not having a local K9 unit is the immediate availability and the time it takes for an outside unit to arrive on the scene. “We usually have to call and see if other agencies are available, and it’s time for us to start pulling our own weight,” he said.
Donations for the Zionsville Police Department K9 Fund
Donations are currently being accepted to fund the purchase, training and care of a K9 dog (and his human partner) for the Zionsville Police Department. Initial cost for purchase and training of the K9 dog is estimated at $20,000.

The Zionsville Police Department K9 Fund is a Tax 5013C Exempt fund. Please forward your donation to:
Zionsville Police Department K9 Fund
1075 Parkway Drive
Zionsville, IN 46077

You may also drop off your donation to the Zionsville Police Department Monday through Friday during regular business hours.
About Police Dogs
Police dogs are one of the most effective and diverse tools used in policing today. They are highly trained, devoted to their task and extremely loyal to their human partner. Dogs have a keen sense of smell and hearing, making them a valuable partner to a police officer. A police dog will respond to noise from 140 yards, compared to about 40 yards for a human. Their speed allows them to easily overtake a person running away.

A police dog is considered a full-fledged police officer, sometimes even given a badge. Besides being terrific companions, they save time for our officers, reduce the number of officers needed for a search, they perform more thorough searches, and they help keep our officers and the community safe during the apprehension of dangerous criminals.
Officer Handling K9
Tracking and searching make up most K9 deployments. A K9 team goes to work only after successfully completing 160-hours of basic training, narcotic detection training, and obtaining state certification. When a service dog retires, the police department usually relinquishes ownership to the officer so that the dog can live out his life as a pet.